Impact of the System of Rice Intensification (SRI) – Analysis of SRI practices in 13 states of India

Impact of the System of Rice Intensification (SRI) – Analysis of SRI practices in 13 states of India
Author(s): K.Palanisami, K.R.Karunakaran and Upali Amarasinghe

The System of Rice Intensification (SRI) – a package of practices designed to grow more rice with less water – is being widely promoted by governments and NGOs in India. In 2010-11, IWMI-Tata Program, in collaboration with local partners, undertook a study covering 2234 rice farmers in 13 major rice growing states to analyze the adoption level and impact of various SRI practices. The results confirm that SRI adopters, on the whole, displayed comparatively higher yield, higher gross margin and lower production costs. However, most ‘SRI farmers’ in the study sample did not adopt the full package of practices due to several constraints. In fact, only 20 percent could be classified as ‘full adopters’ while the rest were ‘low adopters’ or ‘partial adopters’. This highlight argues that a targeted approach that offers farmers flexibility in adopting a sub-set of SRI practices in accordance with the local resources conditions can have a significant impact on paddy productivity.

http://www.iwmi.cgiar.org/iwmi-tata/pdfs/2012_Highlight-07.pdf

Enhancing employment and sustaining production – Framework for Integration of System of Rice Intensification with Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme (MGNREGS)

“Enhancing employment and sustaining production – Framework for Integration of System of Rice Intensification with Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme (MGNREGS)”, National Consortium on SRI, released for the Round Table Meeting on SRI for the XII Five Year Plan held at CSD in Delhi on 13 January, 2012. This note lays out a framework for supporting SRI under MGNREGS is intended for evolving a programmatic action. It draws insights from field experiences across the country in compiling the options and the framework. Please click on the below book cover link:

http://www.sri-india.net/documents/SRI_MGNREGS_2012.pdf

Proceedings of “AP SRI Consortium’s Safe Alternate Wetting and Drying Technology and Water Management in System of Rice Intensification (SRI)

Proceedings of “AP SRI Consortium’s Safe Alternate Wetting and Drying Technology and Water Management in System of Rice Intensification (SRI)” organized by WALAMTARI, IRRC Water-saving workgroup of IRRI and WASSAN held at 3rd October 2012 held at WALAMTARI, Rajendranagar, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh. In addition to sharing of sharing of experiences of IRRI on Alternate Wetting and Drying (AWD), the meetingwas expected to enable discussions on various options in water savings in rice cultivation. The conclusions were expected to feed into improving the practices of SRI in the JAI-SRI program of the AP SRI Consortium supported by the Department of Agriculture and NABARD. A collaborative action-research program is also expected to emerge out of the discussions on the major action-research flagged. For more details, please click the link below to view the Proceedings of the above workshop.
http://www.wassan.org/jaisri_ap/documents/Proceedings_Safe_Alternate_Wetting_2012.pdf

A CRITICAL ASSESSMENT OF THE IMPORTANCE OF SEEDLING AGE IN THE SYSTEM OF RICE INTENSIFICATION (SRI) IN EASTERN INDIA

By DEBAL DEB†‡, JÖRG LÄSSIG§ and MARIUS KLOFT¶
†Centre for Interdisciplinary Studies, Kolkata 700123, India, §Institute of Computational Science, University of Lugano, 6906 Lugano, Switzerland and ¶Machine Learning Laboratory, TU Berlin, 10587 Berlin, Germany
(Accepted 19 January 2012; First published online 27 February 2012)
SUMMARY
A survey of the system of rice intensification (SRI)-related literature indicates that different authors have drawn conflicting inferences about rice yield performances under the SRI, chiefly because the SRI methodology has been variously advocated, interpreted and implemented in the field using different rice varieties, seedling ages at transplantation, cultivation seasons and nutrient management regimes. In particular, the SRI method of single-seedling transplantation (SST) has potential economic advantage due to reduced seed costs, but it is not clear whether SST is an effective management strategy across a range of seedling ages, and whether there is any specific seedling age that is optimal for yield improvement of a given rice variety. This is an important consideration in rain-fed ecosystems where variable rainfall patterns and lack of controlled irrigation make it difficult to reliably transplant at a specific seedling age as recommended for the SRI. We conducted a five year-long experiment on a rain-fed organic farm using a short-duration upland and a medium-duration lowland landrace, following the SRI methodology. Rice seedlings of different ages (6, 10, 14, 18 and 28 days after establishment) were transplanted at 25 cm × 25 cm spacing in three replicated plots. The performance for each landrace was examined with respect to productive tillers, panicle density, total grain counts per hill and grain yield per unit area. Performances
of seedlings of different ages were compared with that of control plots that employed all SRI practices with the exception that 28-day-old seedlings were transplanted with three seedlings per hill. The results indicate that (1) the SRI can improve mean panicle density if seedling age ≤ 18 days, but that responses differ between varieties; (2) the number of productive tillers per hill is significantly less in SST than that of multiple seedling transplants (MST) of 28-day-old seedlings of both upland and lowland varieties; (3) the total grain numbers per hill of the lowland variety is significantly greater for 14-day-old SST than 28-day-old MST; (4) the grain yield per unit area from young SRI transplants is significantly greater than that from 28-day-old MST for the lowland variety, although the magnitude of the improvement was small; (5) for the upland variety, grain yields declined with the oldest seedlings, but planting multiple seedlings
per hill made the yield of the oldest transplants on par with that of younger seedlings planted singly. Our findings suggest that transplanting younger seedlings under the SRI management may not necessarily
enhance grain yields.

Transforming Rice Production with SRI (System of Rice Intensification) Knowledge and Practice

The book “Transforming Rice Production with SRI (System of Rice Intensification) Knowledge and Practice” written by Dr. T.M. Thiyagarajan and Dr. Biksham Gujja, is an attempt to explain the origin, principles and practices of SRI and the developments so far in communicating the importance of SRI to rice farmers, students, scientists and policy makers so that the material could be used for extension, research and policy support. The contents have been assembled from various sources, especially from SRI websites, WWF-ICRISAT project and its partner organizations and Institutes, presentations made in national SRI symposia, publications and reports on SRI, field visits and interaction with farmers.
Below provided is the direct link for downloading the pdf file of the book.

Inline image 1

Genetic yield potential of rice (Oryza sativa) through water saving and high-yielding SRI technology

SURENDRA K GHRITLAHRE, ASHOK KUMAR SARIAL, and RATTAN SINGH, MANGAT RAM, DES RAJ ANEJA
CCS Haryana Agricultural University Campus, Kaul, Haryana 136 021

The system of rice intensification (SRI) that evolved in the 1980s in Madagascar is also gaining popularity in India. SRI saves not only the seed (a seed rate of 5–7 kg/ha as against 25–30 kg/ha for normal) but also saves water (35–40%) as the fields are not inundated continuously. It leads to higher ripening ratio and increases yield by 10–25%. The varietal response to SRI and conventional cultivation is wide.  The system of rice intensification (SRI) that evolved in the 1980s in Madagascar is also gaining popularity in India.  SRI saves not only the seed (a seed rate of 5–7 kg/ha as against 25–30 kg/ha for normal) but also saves water (35–40%) as the fields are not inundated continuously. It leads to higher ripening ratio and increases yield by 10–25%. The varietal response to SRI and conventional cultivation is wide. Varieties differed in their genetic potential and all the varieties are not promising for SRI cultivation. There is need to develop/identify varieties that give better response to SRI cultivation. Therefore, the present investigation on comparative evaluation of rice genotypes for yield and its components under SRI and conventional system was undertaken to identify suitable cultivars for SRI. Varieties differed in their genetic potential and all the varieties are not promising for SRI cultivation. There is need to develop/identify varieties that give better response to SRI cultivation. Therefore, the present investigation on comparative evaluation of rice genotypes for yield and its components under SRI and conventional system was undertaken to identify suitable cultivars for SRI.

Only 2 per cent ryots benefit under MGNREGA

K. N. MURALI SANKAR

http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-national/tp-andhrapradesh/article3268447.ece

A mere 2 per cent of paddy farmers from East Godavari district can be benefited from the offering of workers under the Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act (MGNREGA), scheduled from April 1, 2012.

As the paddy farmers have been accusing the government of throwing them into debts by way of increasing the labour costs by introducing the MGNREGA, a decision has been taken to bring the paddy cultivation into the fold of the scheme. However, labourers will be allocated only to those who are opting for the System of Rice Intensification (SRI) cultivation.

In the district which is known for its canal system, paddy farmers are using SRI technique only on an extent of 5,000 hectares.

According to the guidelines announced by the Union Rural Development Minister Jairam Ramesh last month, each small and medium SRI farmer will be eligible for eight person-days of work per acre for one-time transplantation, two person-days of work per acre for weeding at 10 to 15 days after transplantation and two person-days of work per acre for weeding at 20 to 30 days after transplantation.

Paddy is being sown on 2.4 lakh hectares during the kharif season and 1.7 lakh hectares during the rabi. Thus, the extent of SRI remains two per cent of the total area in the kharif and three per cent in the rabi season.

“The government’s decision hardly makes any difference. If it is sincere towards the farmers, it must expand the employment guarantee scheme to the entire agriculture sector,” says Yellapu Suryanarayana, general secretary of the Bharatiya Kisan Sangh.

“Instead of SRI cultivation, the scheme can be extended to direct sowing method. It is beneficial to a good number of paddy farmers not just in East Godavari,” says Kovvuri Trinadha Reddy, general secretary of the A.P. Farmers Water Management Committees Association.