Transforming Rice Production with SRI (System of Rice Intensification) Knowledge and Practice

“Transforming Rice Production with SRI (System of Rice Intensification) Knowledge and Practice” written by Dr. T.M. Thiyagarajan and Dr. Biksham Gujja. This book is an attempt to explain the origin, principles and practices of SRI and the developments so far in communicating the importance of SRI to rice farmers, students, scientists and policy makers so that the material could be used for extension, research and policy support. The contents have been assembled from various sources, especially from SRI websites, WWF-ICRISAT project and its partner organizations and Institutes, presentations made in national SRI symposia, publications and reports on SRI, field visits and interaction with farmers. Below provided is the direct link for downloading the pdf file of the book.
http://www.agsri.com/images/documents/sri/SRI_Book_Final_Version.pdf

Report on System of Rice Intensification (2011-2012) – Jharkhand state, India

The report presents the results and outcome of the SRI pilot project supported by NABARD in the State of Jharkhand ove a period of two years, 2010-2012, involving, 34,170 farmers and covering 8,542 acres of paddy-growing area. In all, 52 projects were implemented through 49 project implementing agencies with support from 5 resource agencies in 23 districts in Jharkhand. The incremental food security through SRI over that of traditional method of cultivation ranged from 118 days in the case of the smallest landholding class (<1 acre) to 683 days in the case of the largest landholding class (>2 acres). The yield attributes of paddy following System of Rice Intensification management showed considerable improvement

 over the yield attributes when following traditional farming. In respect to number of effective tillers per hill, the average count was 32.5 under SRI as against 5 under traditional method, number of grains per panicle was 219 under SRI as against 137 under traditional management, grain yield was 62 Q/ha under SRI as against 33 Q/ha under traditional practice; and straw yield was 68 Q/ha under SRI and 41 Q/ha with traditional method. The results also indicated much better economic returns from SRI compared to traditional system of rice cultivation. Please find enclosed a scanned copy of the Cover image.

If you are interested in receiving a copy of the report, you can contact NABARD Regional office, Ranchi, Jharkhand: Tel. No. (0651) 2361227 and Fax. No. (0651) – 2361108 and email: ranchi@nabard.org.

Crop and water productivity as influenced by rice cultivation methods under organic and inorganic sources of nutrient supply

Crop and water productivity as influenced by rice cultivation methods under organic and inorganic sources of nutrient supply
Author by Y.V. Singh, Centre for Conservation and Utilization of Blue Green Algae (CCUBGA), Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi – 110 012, India, Email: yvsingh63@yahoo.co.in; yvsingh_algal@iari.res.in
Source: Paddy and Water Environment [http://www.springerlink.com/content/j483155l860236t1/]
Publication Date: 28 August 2012

ABSTRACT

A field experiment was conducted during the wet seasons of 2010 and 2011 at New Delhi, India to study the influence of organic, inorganic, and integrated sources of nutrient supply under three methods of rice cultivation on rice yield and water productivity. The experiments were laid out in FRBD with nine treatment combinations. Treatment combinations included three sources of nutrient supply viz., organic, integrated nutrient management, and inorganic nutrition and three rice production systems viz., conventional transplanting, system of rice intensification (SRI) and aerobic rice system. indicated that the conventional and SRI showed at par grain and straw yields but their yields were significantly higher than aerobic rice. Grain yield under organic, inorganic and integrated sources of nutrient supply was at par since the base nutrient dose was same. Plant growth parameters like plant height, tillers, and dry matter accumulation at harvest stage were almost same under conventional and SRI but superior than aerobic rice system. Root knot nematode infestation was significantly higher in aerobic rice as compared to SRI and conventional rice. However, organic, inorganic and integrated sources of nutrient supply did not affect nematode infestation. There was significant advantage in term of water productivity under SRI over conventional transplanted (CT) rice and less quantity of water was utilized in SRI for production of each unit of grain. A water saving of 34.5–36.0 % in SRI and 28.9–32.1 % in aerobic rice was recorded as compared to CT rice.

“Nalanda District (Bihar) – World Record SRI yields

“Nalanda District (Bihar) – World Record SRI yields” (page Nos. 1 to 10)
Author(s) by M.C. Diwakar, Arvind Kumar, Anil Verma and Dr. Norman Uphoff

Experimenting with SRI cultivation, five farmers of Darveshpura village in Bihar attract considerable attention with their bumper yield; the results indicate a viable alternative to the conventional methods of growing rice and other crops.

See on page 1 to 10 (http://www.pradan.net/images/Media/news_reach_july_aug2012.pdf)

Impact of the System of Rice Intensification (SRI) – Analysis of SRI practices in 13 states of India

Impact of the System of Rice Intensification (SRI) – Analysis of SRI practices in 13 states of India
Author(s): K.Palanisami, K.R.Karunakaran and Upali Amarasinghe

The System of Rice Intensification (SRI) – a package of practices designed to grow more rice with less water – is being widely promoted by governments and NGOs in India. In 2010-11, IWMI-Tata Program, in collaboration with local partners, undertook a study covering 2234 rice farmers in 13 major rice growing states to analyze the adoption level and impact of various SRI practices. The results confirm that SRI adopters, on the whole, displayed comparatively higher yield, higher gross margin and lower production costs. However, most ‘SRI farmers’ in the study sample did not adopt the full package of practices due to several constraints. In fact, only 20 percent could be classified as ‘full adopters’ while the rest were ‘low adopters’ or ‘partial adopters’. This highlight argues that a targeted approach that offers farmers flexibility in adopting a sub-set of SRI practices in accordance with the local resources conditions can have a significant impact on paddy productivity.

http://www.iwmi.cgiar.org/iwmi-tata/pdfs/2012_Highlight-07.pdf

Enhancing employment and sustaining production – Framework for Integration of System of Rice Intensification with Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme (MGNREGS)

“Enhancing employment and sustaining production – Framework for Integration of System of Rice Intensification with Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme (MGNREGS)”, National Consortium on SRI, released for the Round Table Meeting on SRI for the XII Five Year Plan held at CSD in Delhi on 13 January, 2012. This note lays out a framework for supporting SRI under MGNREGS is intended for evolving a programmatic action. It draws insights from field experiences across the country in compiling the options and the framework. Please click on the below book cover link:

http://www.sri-india.net/documents/SRI_MGNREGS_2012.pdf

Proceedings of “AP SRI Consortium’s Safe Alternate Wetting and Drying Technology and Water Management in System of Rice Intensification (SRI)

Proceedings of “AP SRI Consortium’s Safe Alternate Wetting and Drying Technology and Water Management in System of Rice Intensification (SRI)” organized by WALAMTARI, IRRC Water-saving workgroup of IRRI and WASSAN held at 3rd October 2012 held at WALAMTARI, Rajendranagar, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh. In addition to sharing of sharing of experiences of IRRI on Alternate Wetting and Drying (AWD), the meetingwas expected to enable discussions on various options in water savings in rice cultivation. The conclusions were expected to feed into improving the practices of SRI in the JAI-SRI program of the AP SRI Consortium supported by the Department of Agriculture and NABARD. A collaborative action-research program is also expected to emerge out of the discussions on the major action-research flagged. For more details, please click the link below to view the Proceedings of the above workshop.
http://www.wassan.org/jaisri_ap/documents/Proceedings_Safe_Alternate_Wetting_2012.pdf

A CRITICAL ASSESSMENT OF THE IMPORTANCE OF SEEDLING AGE IN THE SYSTEM OF RICE INTENSIFICATION (SRI) IN EASTERN INDIA

By DEBAL DEB†‡, JÖRG LÄSSIG§ and MARIUS KLOFT¶
†Centre for Interdisciplinary Studies, Kolkata 700123, India, §Institute of Computational Science, University of Lugano, 6906 Lugano, Switzerland and ¶Machine Learning Laboratory, TU Berlin, 10587 Berlin, Germany
(Accepted 19 January 2012; First published online 27 February 2012)
SUMMARY
A survey of the system of rice intensification (SRI)-related literature indicates that different authors have drawn conflicting inferences about rice yield performances under the SRI, chiefly because the SRI methodology has been variously advocated, interpreted and implemented in the field using different rice varieties, seedling ages at transplantation, cultivation seasons and nutrient management regimes. In particular, the SRI method of single-seedling transplantation (SST) has potential economic advantage due to reduced seed costs, but it is not clear whether SST is an effective management strategy across a range of seedling ages, and whether there is any specific seedling age that is optimal for yield improvement of a given rice variety. This is an important consideration in rain-fed ecosystems where variable rainfall patterns and lack of controlled irrigation make it difficult to reliably transplant at a specific seedling age as recommended for the SRI. We conducted a five year-long experiment on a rain-fed organic farm using a short-duration upland and a medium-duration lowland landrace, following the SRI methodology. Rice seedlings of different ages (6, 10, 14, 18 and 28 days after establishment) were transplanted at 25 cm × 25 cm spacing in three replicated plots. The performance for each landrace was examined with respect to productive tillers, panicle density, total grain counts per hill and grain yield per unit area. Performances
of seedlings of different ages were compared with that of control plots that employed all SRI practices with the exception that 28-day-old seedlings were transplanted with three seedlings per hill. The results indicate that (1) the SRI can improve mean panicle density if seedling age ≤ 18 days, but that responses differ between varieties; (2) the number of productive tillers per hill is significantly less in SST than that of multiple seedling transplants (MST) of 28-day-old seedlings of both upland and lowland varieties; (3) the total grain numbers per hill of the lowland variety is significantly greater for 14-day-old SST than 28-day-old MST; (4) the grain yield per unit area from young SRI transplants is significantly greater than that from 28-day-old MST for the lowland variety, although the magnitude of the improvement was small; (5) for the upland variety, grain yields declined with the oldest seedlings, but planting multiple seedlings
per hill made the yield of the oldest transplants on par with that of younger seedlings planted singly. Our findings suggest that transplanting younger seedlings under the SRI management may not necessarily
enhance grain yields.

Transforming Rice Production with SRI (System of Rice Intensification) Knowledge and Practice

The book “Transforming Rice Production with SRI (System of Rice Intensification) Knowledge and Practice” written by Dr. T.M. Thiyagarajan and Dr. Biksham Gujja, is an attempt to explain the origin, principles and practices of SRI and the developments so far in communicating the importance of SRI to rice farmers, students, scientists and policy makers so that the material could be used for extension, research and policy support. The contents have been assembled from various sources, especially from SRI websites, WWF-ICRISAT project and its partner organizations and Institutes, presentations made in national SRI symposia, publications and reports on SRI, field visits and interaction with farmers.
Below provided is the direct link for downloading the pdf file of the book.

Inline image 1

Genetic yield potential of rice (Oryza sativa) through water saving and high-yielding SRI technology

SURENDRA K GHRITLAHRE, ASHOK KUMAR SARIAL, and RATTAN SINGH, MANGAT RAM, DES RAJ ANEJA
CCS Haryana Agricultural University Campus, Kaul, Haryana 136 021

The system of rice intensification (SRI) that evolved in the 1980s in Madagascar is also gaining popularity in India. SRI saves not only the seed (a seed rate of 5–7 kg/ha as against 25–30 kg/ha for normal) but also saves water (35–40%) as the fields are not inundated continuously. It leads to higher ripening ratio and increases yield by 10–25%. The varietal response to SRI and conventional cultivation is wide.  The system of rice intensification (SRI) that evolved in the 1980s in Madagascar is also gaining popularity in India.  SRI saves not only the seed (a seed rate of 5–7 kg/ha as against 25–30 kg/ha for normal) but also saves water (35–40%) as the fields are not inundated continuously. It leads to higher ripening ratio and increases yield by 10–25%. The varietal response to SRI and conventional cultivation is wide. Varieties differed in their genetic potential and all the varieties are not promising for SRI cultivation. There is need to develop/identify varieties that give better response to SRI cultivation. Therefore, the present investigation on comparative evaluation of rice genotypes for yield and its components under SRI and conventional system was undertaken to identify suitable cultivars for SRI. Varieties differed in their genetic potential and all the varieties are not promising for SRI cultivation. There is need to develop/identify varieties that give better response to SRI cultivation. Therefore, the present investigation on comparative evaluation of rice genotypes for yield and its components under SRI and conventional system was undertaken to identify suitable cultivars for SRI.