Causes of emissions from agricultural residue burning in North-West India: evaluation of a technology policy response

Causes of emissions from agricultural residue burning in North-West India: evaluation of a technology policy response
Author: Ridhima Gupta
Source: South Asian Network for Development and Environmental Economics

The burning of agricultural field residue, such as stalks and stubble, during the wheat and rice harvesting seasons in the Indo-Gangetic plains results in substantial emissions of trace gases and particles. This pollution can have adverse health and climate impacts. Paper uses a representative sample of farmers from the seven districts of Punjab to identify the determinants of emissions from open-field burning of rice residue. The study finds that the use of coarse varieties of rice as opposed to fine-grained varieties such as Basmati increases the likelihood of farmers using the combine-harvester technology, which in turn makes burning almost certain. Although a ban on burning residue was in effect in Amritsar district during the year of the survey, it had moderate impact on burning.

http://www.indiaenvironmentportal.org.in/files/file/agricultural%20burning.pdf

Partitioning of CH4 and CO2 production originating from rice straw, soil and root organic carbon in rice microcosms

Partitioning of CH4 and CO2 production originating from rice straw, soil and root organic carbon in rice microcosms
Author(s): Quan Yuan, Judith Pump, Ralf Conrad
Source: PLoS ONE | November 5, 2012

Flooded rice fields are an important source of the greenhouse gas CH4. Possible carbon sources for CH4 and CO2 production in rice fields are soil organic matter (SOM), root organic carbon (ROC) and rice straw (RS), but partitioning of the flux between the different carbon sources is difficult. We conducted greenhouse experiments using soil microcosms planted with rice.

http://www.plosone.org/article/fetchObjectAttachment.action;jsessionid=57CCBF742B732BA8A41EB07736ED366E?uri=info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0049073&representation=PDF

Household greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in rural areas – A Study

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Rural energy consumption, mostly based on fuelwood, is often seen as a major source of GHG emissions. This study’s main aim is to determine the relationship between tribal household energy habits and the subsequent greenhouse gas emissions.  Emissions were classified based upon household economic and compositional factors and five emission sources, including cooking/boiling, lighting, machinery, waste-burning and religious activities, were analysed.

This report brings out the process and the conclusions of the study.

Carbon protocals

1. The long awaited two new GHG Protocol Standards for Product and Value Chain GHG assessments were officially released on Tuesday, 4 October 2011.
Please visit 
www.ghgprotocol.org for more information. Here you can also download the new standards for free, as well as a range of accompanying tools and guidance documents.

2. A revised version of PAS 2050, the first carbon footprint specification originally published in 2008, was released on 30 September 2011.
Please find background information and a download link at http://www.bsigroup.com/en/Standards-and-Publications/How-we-can-help-you/Professional-Standards-Service/PAS-2050/PAS-2050/

3. The European Commission has released a draft version of the EU environmental footprinting methodology currently under development.
Please find more information and the draft methodology at http://ec.europa.eu/environment/eussd/product_footprint.htm

4. Furthermore, new information on the currently ongoing French National Experiment for environmental labelling has been published, including practical approaches for communication:
Please visit http://www.developpement-durable.gouv.fr/experimentation-affichage for more information.