Archive for Ramoo

Who benefits from GM Crops? 2014: Report by Friends of Earth

by Friends of the Earth International — last modified Apr 24, 2014 03:30 PM

The latest ‘Who benefits from GM crops’ report suggests that an increasing number of states are suspending GM crops.

Read a summary of the report

 

 

  • The report reveals that 90 per cent of GM crops are grown in just six countries and by less than one per cent of the world farming population. An analysis of industry figures shows the claimed increase in GM planting in 2013 remains confined to these six countries.
  • The number of countries cultivating genetically modified (GM) crops is in decline, with Poland and Egypt the latest countries to suspend GM crop production.
  • There is also little evidence that new GM varieties are the best way to improve nutrition or increase our capacity to adapt to climate change. Ninety nine per cent of available GM crops on the market have been modified to resist pesticides or produce their own, resulting in spiraling pesticide use.
  • Countries such as Mexico, Kenya, Egypt and Poland have recently suspended cultivation of certain GM crops. Around the world, experts are calling for a shift to agro-ecological farming methods to tackle hunger and malnutrition. These methods have been shown to double yields in Africa and effectively tackle pests.
  • Countries such as the USA, Argentina and Brazil, some of the world’s top producers of GM crops, are seeing an upward trend in the use of chemical pesticides as a result of their long-term adoption of GM crops.
  • In Africa GM crops are grown only in three countries, South Africa, Burkina Faso and Sudan. However, extreme pressure from biotech companies threatens to open up the continent to GM crops. A recent Kenyan decision to ban GM crops came under fire from lobbyists.

Read the full report (pdf)

Read the executive summary in English (pdf)

Link between insecticides and collapse of honey bee colonies strengthened

Date:May 9, 2014 Source:Harvard School of Public Health

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140509110713.htm

http://www.bulletinofinsectology.org/pdfarticles/vol67-2014-125-130lu.pdf

Summary:
Two widely used neonicotinoids — a class of insecticide — appear to significantly harm honey bee colonies over the winter, particularly during colder winters, according to researchers. The study replicated a 2012 finding from the same research group that found a link between imidacloprid and Colony Collapse Disorder, in which bees abandon their hives over the winter and eventually die. The new study found low doses of a second neonicotinoid, clothianidin, had the same negative effect.

Two widely used neonicotinoids — a class of insecticide — appear to significantly harm honey bee colonies over the winter, particularly during colder winters, according to a new study.
Credit: © Dmytro Smaglov / Fotolia

Two widely used neonicotinoids — a class of insecticide — appear to significantly harm honey bee colonies over the winter, particularly during colder winters, according to a new study from Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH). The study replicated a 2012 finding from the same research group that found a link between low doses of imidacloprid and Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), in which bees abandon their hives over the winter and eventually die. The new study also found that low doses of a second neonicotinoid, clothianidin, had the same negative effect.

Further, although other studies have suggested that CCD-related mortality in honey bee colonies may come from bees’ reduced resistance to mites or parasites as a result of exposure to pesticides, the new study found that bees in the hives exhibiting CCD had almost identical levels of pathogen infestation as a group of control hives, most of which survived the winter. This finding suggests that the neonicotinoids are causing some other kind of biological mechanism in bees that in turn leads to CCD.

The study appears online May 9, 2014 in the Bulletin of Insectology.

“We demonstrated again in this study that neonicotinoids are highly likely to be responsible for triggering CCD in honey bee hives that were healthy prior to the arrival of winter,” said lead author Chensheng (Alex) Lu, associate professor of environmental exposure biology at HSPH.

Since 2006, there have been significant losses of honey bees from CCD. Pinpointing the cause is crucial to mitigating this problem since bees are prime pollinators of roughly one-third of all crops worldwide. Experts have considered a number of possible causes, including pathogen infestation, beekeeping practices, and pesticide exposure. Recent findings, including a 2012 study by Lu and colleagues, suggest that CCD is related specifically to neonicotinoids, which may impair bees’ neurological functions. Imidacloprid and clothianidin both belong to this group.

Lu and his co-authors from the Worcester County Beekeepers Association studied the health of 18 bee colonies in three locations in central Massachusetts from October 2012 through April 2013. At each location, the researchers separated six colonies into three groups — one treated with imidacloprid, one with clothianidin, and one untreated.

There was a steady decline in the size of all the bee colonies through the beginning of winter — typical among hives during the colder months in New England. Beginning in January 2013, bee populations in the control colonies began to increase as expected, but populations in the neonicotinoid-treated hives continued to decline. By April 2013, 6 out of 12 of the neonicotinoid-treated colonies were lost, with abandoned hives that are typical of CCD. Only one of the control colonies was lost — thousands of dead bees were found inside the hive — with what appeared to be symptoms of a common intestinal parasite called Nosema ceranae.

While the 12 pesticide-treated hives in the current study experienced a 50% CCD mortality rate, the authors noted that, in their 2012 study, bees in pesticide-treated hives had a much higher CCD mortality rate — 94%. That earlier bee die-off occurred during the particularly cold and prolonged winter of 2010-2011 in central Massachusetts, leading the authors to speculate that colder temperatures, in combination with neonicotinoids, may play a role in the severity of CCD.

“Although we have demonstrated the validity of the association between neonicotinoids and CCD in this study, future research could help elucidate the biological mechanism that is responsible for linking sub-lethal neonicotinoid exposures to CCD,” said Lu. “Hopefully we can reverse the continuing trend of honey bee loss.”


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Harvard School of Public Health. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Chensheng Lu, Kenneth M. Warchol, Richard A. Callahan. Sub-lethal exposure to neonicotinoids impaired honey bees winterization before proceeding to colony collapse disorder. Bulletin of Insectology, May 9, 2014

Children exposed to toxic pesticides

by kim willsher

http://www.thestar.com.my/News/Environment/2014/05/05/Children-exposed-to-toxic-pesticides/

Kids being poisoned: Pesticides sprayed in French farms and vineyards are being absorbed by children living nearby, claims the group Generations Futures. -AFP

Kids being poisoned: Pesticides sprayed in French farms and vineyards are being absorbed by children living nearby, claims the group Generations Futures. -AFP

A study shows that several children from agricultural areas in France have been exposed to harmful chemicals.

French children in agricultural areas are being exposed to a dangerous cocktail of pesticides, some of them banned, a French health and environment group has claimed.

Generations Futures carried out independent analysis of the hair of young people living or studying near farms or vineyards after parents expressed concern about their children being exposed to poisons that could disrupt their endocrine system. The group, a non-profit organisation specialising in the use and effects of pesticides on humans and the environment, says its findings confirmed their fears.

Researchers took hair samples from a selected group of children aged between three and 10 living or attending schools between 50m and 200m from different agricultural zones. It sent the samples to an independent laboratory in Luxembourg that used methods similar to those employed by detectives investigating poisoning cases.

A total of 624 pesticide traces were found in the 29 samples tested – one sample was deemed of insufficient quantity – suggesting that 80% of the children had been exposed to agricultural pesticides in the previous three months. In total, the laboratory found traces of 53 pesticides believed to affect the hormone system of mammals, leading to cancerous tumours, birth defects, developmental disorders and learning disabilities in humans.

An average of 21.52 different pesticides were found for each child, 35 so-called “endocrine disruptor” pesticides were found at least once, while 13 were discovered in every hair sample. Just under three-quarters of the children ate organic produce regularly, suggesting the contamination came from an outside source and not their food.

“The presence of more than 21 pesticides, on average, that are endocrine disruptors in the hair that was analysed shows that our children are exposed to a significant cocktail of these substances,” said Francois Veillerette, a spokesperson for Generations Futures. “Now the European Commission must finally make public a clear and protective definition of the endocrine disruptors that have to be banned.”

The group’s report urges urgent action. “Our demand is simple and based on an ambitious goal: no organism should contain endocrine disruptors, in order to protect the health of unborn children.”

The group says the French government’s own national strategy to deal with endocrine disruptors has reached a dead end. The plan was originally to be published in 2013, but has been repeatedly postponed until the end of this month.

“Because children are part of the population especially vulnerable to the dangers of endocrine disruptors, they should not be exposed to them,” it said.

The research showed that several children had been exposed to harmful chemicals banned in agricultural use but still used in parasite treatments for pet animals.

Jean-Charles Bocquet, director of the European Association of Plant Protection Product Manufacturers, dismissed the research. “The presence of pesticide traces is not necessarily indicative of a health danger, especially in infinitely small doses. I’m sure you’d find traces of diesel in our hair if you looked for it,” he said.

Veillerette disagreed. “It’s not the dose that’s the problem, but the accumulation of pesticides causing a cocktail effect,” he said. Generations Futures says it has sent its findings to a specialised university research team for further analysis. – Guardian News & Media

GM case hearing Today: Read how PMO is trying to push

A 2-judge Bench in the Supreme Court has been listening to arguments in the GMOs PIL since yesterday, on field trials, on the TEC (Technical Expert Committee) recommendations. Today’s hearing is crucial.

The Government and proponents have been pushing GMOs giving arguments like:

- they are needed for the country’s food security (THE FORMER MOEF HERSELF HAS WRITTEN A STRONG LETTER TO THE PM CONTESTING THE FOOD SECURITY ARGUMENTS – text of this letter attached);

- the nation’s scientists will feel demoralised if we ban GM since we have made so much investments so far (LET THE FARMERS WHO ARE DEMORALISED AND ARE COMMITTING SUICIDES WITH THE RISKINESS OF BT COTTON BE DAMNED??),

- that nothing adverse has happened in our regulation since 2007 from the time SC gave a go-ahead for field trials (ignoring that the Ministry of Agriculture’s own Sopory Committee report pointed out that contamination has happened between Bikaneri Bt cotton and Monsanto’s Bt cotton inside an agriculture university - http://www.icar.org.in/en/node/5511; ignoring evidence brought out of violations in field trials in Jharkhand and other places; I ATTACH HERE SIX SOLID INSTANCES WHEN OUR REGULATORS HAVE FAILED GROSSLY; THE FACT THAT THERE IS SO MUCH ILLEGAL HERBICIDE TOLERANT COTTON ALL AROUND US IS PROOF ENOUGH.

- that we can’t learn better regulation from countries like Norway since only 2% of their population depends on agriculture – AS THOUGH LEARNING FROM THE USA IS OK, WHERE LESS THAN 2% OF POPULATION DEPENDS ON AGRICULTURE!!!;

- that Dr Paroda is very good with his views, ignoring how this man’s organisation receives funding from Mahyco and others;  and ignoring that the point in question is biosafety and five other independent, “un-conflicted” experts in the field of biosafety are having a unanimous view on what should be done now when they have in their majority TEC report etc).

NOW, CHECK OUT THE ATTACHED, WHICH NITIN SETHI OF BUSINESS STANDARD PUT OUT LATE LAST NIGHT IN A TWEET. THIS IS AN INTERNAL MOEF DOCUMENT WHERE JAYANTHI NATARAJAN AND HER MINISTRY ARE STRONGLY OBJECTING TO THE OTHER ARMS OF THE GOVERNMENT PUSHING PARTICULAR VIEWS ON GM AND PASSING IT OFF AS THE GOVERNMENT’S VIEWS. They are very clearly saying that these are not their views. And we know what happened to Jayanthi Natarajan ten days after these views were penned down.  (Read MOEF letter to PMO)

“Despite my insistence that MoEF should file a separate affidavit……The elaborate comments on both reports – the 5 member TEC and Dr Paroda’s dissent note and the views of Government of INdia contained from pages 6 to page 33, are not reflective of my views or that of MoEF. These are the views of MoA. It is not known on what basis these views have been taken and whether the views of environmental scientists have been recorded with agricultural scientists. These submissions require modification and may perhaps be deleted due to time constraint in sorting out the differences”, Jayanthi Natarajan says, amongst other things. While the final affidavit may or may not be the same as the draft that she is referring to, some of us who got to see the final affidavit of the UoI submitted in the Court can see what she is objecting to.  (JN ltr to PM)

The GM issue has JN ltr to PM always been bewildering in terms of the pressure that comes from the top-most post, the Prime Minister, ignoring all evidence that is pointing to caution. That it is a dangerous, costly distraction from real answers elsewhere. That we should just take those to our farmers.

Who is he trying to please (coalition partners, industry, America….)? On What basis does he have such views in favour of GM that they will not first sort out fundamental issues that are being raised by various credible agencies??

We wait to hear what the Bench has to say, with fingers crossed.

Courtesy: Kavitha Kuruganti, Alliance for Sustainable and Holistic Agriculture

Report of Expert Committee setup on the Orders of High Court of Delhi to frame a policy for Monitoring of Pesticide Residues in Fruits & Vegetables

http://agricoop.nic.in/

Report of Expert Committee setup on the Orders of High Court of Delhi to frame a policy for Monitoring of Pesticide Residues in Fruits & Vegetables.New

On the directions dated 5th March, 2014 of the Hon,ble High Court of Delhi in W.P. No. 7495/2010 –Court on its own motion Vrs. U.O.I. & Others the competent authority has decided that the report of Expert Committee to frame a policy for Monitoring of Pesticide Residues in Fruits & Vegetables.

Click here for more details.

 

Complaint to EC asking right to move to court on unfulfilled promises from Manifestos

140407 on political parties-1

EC complaint press release telugu

To

The Chief Election Commissioner                                                                                           07-04-2014

Election Commission

New Delhi

 

Respected sir

Sub: Poll promises of political parties request to enforce model code of conduct reg.

Ref: 1. TDP, TRS, YSRCP Manifestos for 2014 Assembly elections and promises by Sri. Chandra Babu Naidu, K. Chandra Sekhara Rao and YS Jagan and their party leaders during election campaign

2. Model Code of Conduct issued by Election Commission section VIII on Manifestos

As the elections are approaching we the Farmers Organisations working with lakhs of farmers in Andhra Pradesh (including Telangana) find that the political parties are making poll promises to woo the voters violating the model code of conduct issued by the EC.  Some of the promises made are impossible to fulfil and have huge burden on the exchequer.

In this situation, we request the Election Commission to immediately intervene and order all the political parties

  • to detail out the terms and conditions of all poll promises and the budgetary implications and sources of the funds as per the Model Code of Conduct issued by Election Commission section VIII on Manifestos based on Supreme court judgement.
  • As the voting would be influenced by these promises we also request you to kindly issue guidelines to ensure that the election promises are fulfilled by the Party/Party alliances which forms the government, otherwise the voters can move to court requesting the implementation of the same.
  • If the political parties are not abiding the model code of conduct regarding the manifestos, we request the Election Commission to cancel their party registration and bar their leaders from contesting in further elections.

Thanking you sir

Yours sincerely

AAP Manifesto for Farmers

#AamKisanPolicy

AAP Farmers Manifesto Telugu

AAP Farmers Manifesto English

Main points made:
Under both Telugu Desam which said “agriculture is a waste” and Congress which came as “farmers’ rule”, AP has been centre of farmer suicides with 2500 farmers committing suicide every year. The crisis has been due to neglect of the government, and lack of assured income from agriculture. Aam Aadmi Party will provide assurance that government will stand by the farmers, and focus on addressing the extreme income disparity between agriculture and organized sector which is driving farmers to despair.
AAP challenges other parties to come up with real solutions to farmers’ problems, and welcomes any party to take up these manifesto promises – instead of deceiving people with false promises like loan waivers which costs about Rs.70,000 crores and
The main highlight points of manifesto are:
(1) Separate Agriculture Budget with 10% of total budget committed to agriculture and allied sectors (not including major irrigation)
(2) Slogan: “Nation’s Food Security comes from Farmers’ Income Security”
AAP promises Income Security system to achieve income of Rs.1,00,000 per annum to each farming household through on-farm and off-farm income.
(3) Slogan: “Before 7th Pay Commission, AAP will set up Farmers’ Income Commission”. (see brief description of farmers’ income commission in manifesto note).
(4) Day-Time Electricity for farmers, with quality power and solar pumpsets.
(5) Loans and Insurance to 30 lakh tenant farmers who are in major distress with no access to support systems. 
(6) Land titles to women farmers
(7) Special package for Farmer-Suicide affected districts at Rs.100 crore per district
(8) Comprehensive review of Jalayagnam projects by sitting High Court judge. Rs.60,000 crores has been spent until now with very little ayacut created.
(9) Special mission for rainfed agriculture and support for dryland crops.

Taken by storm: responding to the impacts of climate change

http://reliefweb.int/sites/reliefweb.int/files/resources/Taken-by-storm-climate-change-report-march-2014.pdf

Christian Aid has published a new report detailing the devastating effects of climate change on some of the poorest communities around the world.

‘Taken by storm: responding to the impacts of climate change’ reveals the way in which developing countries including the Philippines, Brazil, Malawi and Bolivia are suffering the worst consequences, and underlines the need for world leaders to respond with urgency.

It calls for “decisive action to be taken at every opportunity” to combat the disastrous effects.

“Short-term adaptation is not enough. Structural change must come from binding commitments at a global level, and must happen now,” it says.

The report is introduced by Lord Williams, former Archbishop of Canterbury and current Chair of Christian Aid. He recalls the flooding that caused chaos in the UK at the beginning of this year, but notes that though it was highly disruptive and shocking for us in the West, “for millions of people around the world, living with this sense of fragility is nothing new”.

“Far from being a vague threat in the distant future, a warming world is very much a present reality,” he warns. “Stronger storm surges, heavier rain, and scarcer resources are part of what countless people across the world live with daily, with far fewer resources to deal with it than we have.

“It is essential for us to remember the specific human faces of those who suffer because of climate instability. Countless communities and families in every affected region of Africa, Latin America and Asia, people with needs and hopes and anxieties like ours, are already forced to cope with circumstances whose difficulty increases daily, and so with the prospect of an extremely bleak future for themselves and their children if nothing changes.”

The report shares stories of some of the individuals who are suffering as a result of what Lord Williams refers to as this “deep injustice”, as a reminder that there are real people suffering, though we are often blind to it in the West.

Marina Acaylan is one of millions who lost their homes in the devastating typhoon that wreaked havoc across the Philippines last year, killing thousands. She used to earn a living by selling homemade rice cakes at the local market, but can no longer do so because the marketplace was also swept away by the storm.

Kenyan farmers Lilian and Alberty Nthiga are finding it increasingly difficult to grow crops due to a lack of rainfall and thus struggle to make ends meet, while Carmen Quispe Dermarca is having to cope with similar difficulties in Bolivia, where the Illimani glacier is melting.

Although people throughout the developing world are continuing to strive to protect their livelihoods, and are finding ways to cope with changing climates, the report notes that “short-term adaptation is only a temporary fix”.

“The long-term solution will only be found when the global community addresses the root causes of climate change, and takes decisive steps to reduce emissions,” it states.

“There is no doubt that climate change is significantly hampering development work, compounding the many struggles faced by people already fighting to free themselves from poverty’s grip.”

Martin Vilela of Agua Sustentable, a charity working in partnership with Christian Aid in Bolivia to help those struggling with water shortages, says: “We can’t constantly be adapting. I think it’s important that the communities find immediate responses to the changes, but we can’t forget that this is a structural problem.

“[A] key area of our work is to show to the global community the reality of the communities…so they can realise that climate change is real and start to take action to find concrete responses at a global level.

“If this is not achieved, many indigenous peoples’ way of life will be destroyed permanently,” he warns.

Christian Aid’s Senior Climate Change Adviser and author of the report Dr Alison Doig has reiterated the importance of immediate action from the world’s leaders.

“People living on the front line of climate change are the canaries in the climate coalmine, but their plight is more than just a warning of what many other parts of the world can expect,” she said.

“These are individuals paying the price for the actions of wealthy nations and people grown rich through continued dependence on polluting fossil fuels.”

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is to publish its latest report on the impacts of climate change on Monday, which is expected to make clear the need for strong intervention.

“It is vital that politicians hear their voices and heed the warnings of the IPCC and make tackling climate change a priority if we are to pass on a safe planet fit for future generations,” Doig concludes.

“The world must act decisively and urgently to reduce emissions, manage resources and protect the vulnerable. In this way, and only this way, will we have the chance for a future that is sustainable and fair for the poorest people in the world.”

NAC Recommendations on Agriculture Extension

Recommendation 1:  Facilitate the development of a performance-linked and accountable extension process for the promotion of sustainable agriculture through India – Sustainable Agricultural Practices

Recommendation 2 Shift from a supply-driven to a demand-driven extension approach

Recommendation 3 Recognize and promote local knowledge and indigenous practices known to farmers – — Systems of  Rice Intensification (SRI) and similar intensification programme for other crops to be supported rigorously

Recommendation 4 Empower smallholder farmers through Group Approach and promote extension systems that work through groups of farmers. The Rural Development Ministry which implements mega programmes through mobilizing farmers into collectives needs to be treated at par with the Ministry of Agriculture in terms of its agriculture extension and be provided with technical backstopping by the ICAR in a like manner

Recommendation 5 Promote robust public-private partnership in agriculture extension and institute a Competitive Agriculture Extension Grant Fund Recommendation 6 Give Major Impetus to ATMA Reform

http://nac.nic.in/communication.php

Communications to Government

Letter date Subject Enclosures
28 Feb, 2014 Recommendations on “Welfare of Tea Plantations Labour” NAC Recommendations (244 KB) PDF will open in new window
28 Feb, 2014 Recommendations on “Innovative Agriculture Extension” NAC Recommendations (348 KB) PDF will open in new window
21 Feb, 2014 Recommendations on ‘Development of Cooperatives in India’ NAC Recommendations (234 KB) PDF will open in new window Executive Summary (201 KB) PDF will open in new window
21 Feb, 2014 Recommendations on ‘Development of Sports in North Eastern Region’ NAC Recommendations (227 KB) PDF will open in new window
03 Jan, 2014 Recommendations on ‘Occupational Health and Safety of Workers in India’. NAC Recommendations and Executive Summary (254 KB) PDF will open in new window
11 Nov, 2013 Recommendations on ‘Agroforestry’. NAC recommendation (174 KB) PDF will open in new window Executive Summary (1.15 MB) PDF will open in new window
04 Oct, 2013 Recommendations on ‘Skill Development of Functionaries in the Social Sector Programmes of the Government’. NAC recommendation and Summary of recommendations (3.98 MB) PDF will open in new window
13, Sep 2013 Third set of recommendations on ‘Reforming Fund Flow System for Flagship Programmes’. NAC recommendation and Summary of recommendations (1.22 MB) PDF will open in new window
16 Aug, 2013 Particularly Vulnerable Tribal Groups (PVTGs) a) NAC recommendation (2.36 MB) PDF will open in new window b) Summary of recommendations (979 KB) PDF will open in new window
15 July, 2013 Reforms in Governance, Strengthening Institutional Capacities and Effective Implentation of Flagship Programmes a) Human Resource Strategies & Policies (197 KB) PDF will open in new window b) Mobilizing and Managing Knowledge Resources (197 KB) PDF will open in new window
08 July, 2013 Universal Health Coverage NAC Recommendations (2.29 MB) PDF will open in new window Summary of Recommendations (99.8 KB) PDF will open in new window
28, May 2013 Pre-Legislative Process NAC Recommendations (76.8 KB) PDF will open in new window
12, Mar 2013 Strengthening of Scheduled Castes & Schedules Tribes (Prevention of Atrocities) Act, 1989 and Rules, 1995 NAC Recommendations (224 KB) PDF will open in new window Summary of Recommendations (71.1 KB) PDF will open in new window
14, Feb 2013 Recommendations on RTE a) Towards ending discrimination in schools b) Monitoring, Accountability and Grievance Redress under RTE   a) Towards ending discrimination in schools (375 KB) PDF will open in new window b) Monitoring, Accountability and Grievance Redress under RTE (138 KB) PDF will open in new window Summary of NAC Recommendations (139 KB) PDF will open in new window
12, Feb 2013 Enhancing Farm Income for Small Holders through Market Integration NAC Recommendations (611 KB) PDF will open in new window Summary of NAC Recommendations (146 KB) PDF will open in new window
31, Dec 2012 Panchayat (Extension to Scheduled Areas) Act 1996 (PESA) NAC Recommendations (248 KB) PDF will open in new window
14, Dec 2012 Development of North Eastern Region NAC Recommendations (403 KB) PDF will open in new window
12, Dec 2012 Recommendations on Strengthening Right to Education NAC Recommendations (218 KB) PDF will open in new window
05, Nov 2012 Recommendations relating to Implementation Framework of Scheduled Caste Sub-Plan (SCSP) and Tribal Sub-Plan (TSP) NAC Recommendations (357 KB) PDF will open in new window
05, June 2012 NAC recommendations for Improving the Sex Ratio at Birth NAC Recommendations (822 KB) PDF will open in new window Summary (207 KB) PDF will open in new window
31, May 2012 Recommendations on the proposed Disability Rights Legislation NAC Recommendations (205 KB) PDF will open in new window Summary of NAC Recommendations (115 KB) PDF will open in new window
16 May, 2012 Recommendations regarding De-notified, Nomadic and Semi-Nomadic Tribes NAC Recommendations (265 KB) PDF will open in new window Summary of NAC Recommendations (154 KB) PDF will open in new window
19, Apr 2012 Social Security for Unorganised Workers NAC Recommendations (923 KB) PDF will open in new window Summary of NAC Recommendations (299 KB) PDF will open in new window
14, Mar 2012 National Programme for shelters and other services for the urban homeless NAC Recommendations (77.5 KB) PDF will open in new window Explanatory Note (230 KB) PDF will open in new window
20, Dec 2011 Reforms proposed for the Rajiv Awas Yojana NAC Recommendations (211 KB) PDF will open in new window
20, Dec 2011 Reforming Scheduled Castes Sub-Plan (SCSP) / Tribal Sub Plan (TSP) NAC Recommendations (260 KB) PDF will open in new window
20, Dec 2011 Towards Inclusive Development to Empower Minorities NAC Recommendations for the 12th Plan (577 KB) PDF will open in new window
20, Dec 2011 Prohibition of Child Labour upto the age of 14 years NAC Recommendations (164 KB) PDF will open in new window
14, Sep 2011 Strengthening Natural Resource Management components under Mahatma Gandhi NREGA Recommendations of the NAC finalized in its meeting held on 28th July, 2011 (641 KB) PDF will open in new window
22, Jul 2011 Prevention of Communal and Targeted Violence (Access to Justice and Reparations) Bill, 2011 Prevention of Communal and Targeted Violence(Access to Justice and Reparations) Bill, 2011 (1 MB) PDF will open in new window Explanatory Note (690 KB) PDF will open in new window
07, Jul 2011 National Food Security Bill, 2011 National Food Security Bill, 2011 (1.1 MB) PDF will open in new window
09, Jun 2011 Recommendations for effective implementation of Mahatma Gandhi NREGS NAC Recommendations finalized in its meeting held on 25th May, 2011 (18.1 KB) 
09, Jun 2011 Recommendations for Follow-up Measures to Eradicate Manual Scavenging NAC Recommendations finalized in its meeting held on 25 May, 2011 (386 KB) 
08, Jun 2011 Recommendations for a Central Law for Protection of Livelihood Rights and Social Security of Street Vendors NAC Recommendations finalized in its meeting held on 25 May, 2011 (263 KB) 
08, Jun 2011 Recommendations for a reformed and strengthened Integrated Child Development Services(ICDS) NAC Recommendations finalized in its meeting held on 25 May, 2011 (233 KB)  Summary of the NAC Recommendations on ICDS (80.6 KB) 
06, Jun 2011 Note of Recommendations on LA and R & R Bill NAC Recommendations finalized in its meeting held on 25 May, 2011 (491 KB) 
04, May 2011 Essential Elements of a National Policy for Domestic Workers NAC Recommendations finalized in its meeting held on 28th April, 2011 (79.4 KB) 
31, Mar 2011 Amendment to RTI Rules proposed by the Department of Personnel & Training NAC Recommendations finalized in its meeting held on 24th March, 2011 (91.4 KB) 
12, Mar 2011 Scheduled Tribes & Other Traditional Forest Dwellers (Recognition of Forest Rights) Act, 2006 NAC Recommendations finalized in its meeting held on 26 February 2011 (1.1 MB) 
02, Feb 2011 Inclusion of certain categories in BPL identification Recommendations of the NAC finalized in its meeting held on 21 January, 2011 (65.6 KB) 
14, Jan 2011 Protection of Women from Sexual Harassment at the Workplace Bill, 2010 NAC Recommendations finalized in its meeting held on 10 January 2011 (8.0 KB) 
09, November, 2010 Eradication of Manual Scavenging Resolution adopted by the NAC in its meeting held on 23 October, 2010 (137 KB) 
27th October, 2010 National Food Security Bill (NFSB) NAC Recommendations finalized in its meeting held on 23 October, 2010 (208 KB) 

International Shifts in Agricultural Debates and Practice: An Historical View of Analyses of Global Agriculture

International Shifts in Agricultural Debates and Practice: An Historical View of Analyses of Global Agriculture

by Feldman and Biggs – 2012 - 

%d bloggers like this: